Book review: Lokians: Book 1: Beyond the End of the World by Aaron Dennis

Faydra Deon
By Faydra Deon September 3, 2012 02:30

Book review: Lokians: Book 1: Beyond the End of the World by Aaron Dennis

Author’s summary: Your neighborhood exterminator can’t handle these cockroaches…call Earth Navy.

Captain O’Hara leads a special operations team aboard an alien ship. Thewls informed Earth Navy the monstrous Lokians, a race of alien roaches, are on the prowl. They ravage the galaxy in search of new technology with which they integrate to enhance their own abilities.

Will the Human crew be enough to stop the alien threat? Why do the Thewls hold fast in their belief that Humans have met their benefactors, the travelers? Captain O’Hara charges across worlds unknown to save the galaxy.

Review:

  • Book cover – 5 points – very vivid and appealing 
     
  • Cohesive storyline – 4 points –  stayed on subject from beginning to end; there were places where the story moved too quickly and all in the same paragraph, which was disconcerting
     
  • Spelling/Grammar/Punctuation (SGP) – 2 points – most compound words were broken up (e.g., nevertheless was written over and over as never the less); extensive missing punctuation (e.g., “Lay out,” instead of “Lay, out…” and “Where are you Captain,” instead of “Where are you, Captain…”); I was surprised to see that the front matter mentions that the book had been edited
     
  • Character development – 4 points – there is a guide that exists at the end of the book that would have been more beneficial in the front matter of the book
     
  • Credibility – 3.5 points – I found a lot of the military references were not credible. No matter whether females were present or not, the author had military personnel giving briefings and calling the entire group “men.” That was never my experience when I was in the military.

    The author has senior officers saluting subordinates first, and way too much saluting happens indoors.

    The female members of the team are constantly called by their first names and referred to as “girls” throughout the book.

    The author writes more than once that the Captain, the main character, is very rigid about protocol, but he only seems to care about protocol when the young, female pilot, whom he had a relationship with before he was promoted, calls him by his first name. The Captain sits with his subordinates and complains about not being up to the task of leading, and more than once he freaks out on missions and has to be calmed and consoled by his subordinates. These are things that never, ever happen in “squared-away” military units with seasoned officers. It is ingrained in them to never show weakness in front of those they lead, even when the number of the group is small. Lastly,what the Captain does at the end of the book and how he does it totally didn’t ring true with me; not based on my military experience, anyway.

OVERALL: This was not a bad book. The battle scenes were awesome, and the author worked very hard, and mostly succeeded, at trying to give you visuals-through-words of what the characters were seeing and experiencing. There was just not-so-good execution of some ideas. I would like to have seen all the information the author put in the back of the book in the front of the book. After the story is over, you get to learn about all the stuff you might be confused about as you read the story; who’s who, weapons references, spaceship references, etc.. I was shocked to see that the very last pages of the book were actually the Table of Contents. I’d say you will like this book.

Faydra Deon
By Faydra Deon September 3, 2012 02:30
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